The mission of CSWMD’s science and technology function is to explore the implications of advances in science and technology for applications having the potential for mass destruction, mass effect, or equivalently high impact to U.S. national security and defense.


 

Recent Publications

CSWMD

Medium | April 2, 2020

Modernizing biotechnology for the fight against COVID-19 and the future of pandemic response

Alexander Titus, Michelle Rozo, and Diane DiEuliis

Alexander Titus, Michelle Rozo, and Diane DiEuliis provide some perspective on the importance of using advanced biotechnology capabilities during the global pandemic.

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CSWMD

Monograph | Sept. 19, 2019

Getting Innovation Right

This monograph is a collection of short papers from a Lawrence Livermore workshop on innovation and long-term competition.

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CSWMD

Research Paper | May 22, 2019

Honey, I Shrunk the Lab: Emerging Microfluidics Technology and its Implications for Chemical, Biological, and Nuclear Weapons

Emerging microfluidics technology has significant extant and potential implications for chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons threats. In E&C Research Paper no. 5, Cyrus Jabbari and Philipp Bleek argue that policymakers concerned about CBRN threats have an opportunity to get ahead of, or at least less behind, some of these developments.

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CSWMD

| Oct. 25, 2018

WMD in the Digital Age: Understanding the Impact of Emerging Technologies

Natasha Bajema

In E&C Research Paper no. 4, Dr. Bajema explores three broad trends associated with emerging technologies that are fundamentally altering the WMD context, changing the threat space, and undermining the traditional tool box for countering WMD: digitization, convergence, and democratization.

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CSWMD

| July 9, 2018

The Digitization of Biology: Understanding the New Risks and Implications for Governance

Natasha E. Bajema, Diane DiEuliis, Charles Lutes, and Yong-Bee Lim

In research paper no. 3, Dr. Natasha Bajema, Dr. Diane DiEuliis, Mr. Charles Lutes and Mr. Yong-Bee Lim explore the implications of the digitization of biology, identify new risks and challenges for governance.

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Research Team


Diane DiEuliis
Senior Research Fellow
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