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Category: Shane Smith

Sept. 16, 2022

North Korean Nuclear Command and Control: Alternatives and Implications

This study examines alternative approaches North Korea could take for command and control of its nuclear forces (NC2) as it makes critical choices on the type of nuclear strategy and posture it wishes to adopt. The report helps fill an important analytical gap in current assessments of North Korea, and also examines implications of North Korea’s choices for U.S. and South Korean deterrence strategies and defense planning. This work can help shed light on the most recent announcements made by North Korea concerning its nuclear forces.

March 10, 2021

Three’s Company? Prioritizing Trilateral Deterrence Against North Korea

Dr. Shane Smith and Brad Glosserman, Tama University, recently wrote a piece for War on the Rocks arguing that the United States should prioritize and operationalize a trilateral U.S.-Japan-South Korea approach to deterring North Korea. Their article offers concrete steps toward building a trilateral deterrence partnership.

May 19, 2020

Renewing US Extended Deterrence Commitments Against North Korea

In his recent article in 38 North, Dr. Shane Smith explores strengthening the U.S. deterrence posture toward North Korea.

July 30, 2018

North Korea's Strategic Culture and Its Evolving Nuclear Strategy

Dr. Shane Smith assesses how North Korea's peculiar strategic culture might impact its decisions over nuclear doctrine and command and control arrangements.

Nov. 22, 2015

Implications for US Extended Deterrence and Assurance in East Asia

North Korea’s burgeoning nuclear program is placing greater demands on US extended deterrence and also raising questions in Seoul and Tokyo about the robustness of US commitments. These challenges are likely to grow over the coming years, as North Korea appears poised to expand the quantity, quality and diversity of weapons systems in its arsenal

Aug. 1, 2015

North Korea's Evolving Nuclear Strategy

Over the past two decades, North Korea’s nuclear program has grown from a proliferation problem to a military threat to its neighbors and the United States. The country is now estimated to possess enough fissile material to build anywhere from six to about thirty nuclear weapons, depending largely on how much highly enriched uranium it has